There are two parts to your business case, and as mentioned in ‘what do you need to put in your business case for partnership‘, there is the rational, logical part and then the emotional part – which isn’t written down. If you are going to make partner, you will need to focus on both parts of your business case. In this post we look at why the emotional part of your business case exists. After all, shouldn’t the best candidate for partnership always get to partner? Well, that’s not always the case. I have heard of partners sitting around the table, openly acknowledging that a candidate has a very strong business case, will credibly lead their part of the firm, and is very likely to make the firm lots of money. But, then something is missing. Something doesn’t connect for the partners at the table, so they turn the candidate down for partnership. This is the emotional bit. When you are accepted into the partnership, you are being admitted into a private club – one where typically you can make a large amount of money. This is why the emotional part of your business case is just as important as the rational logical part. It’s very difficult to convey in a written business case, why you truly ‘fit in’, ‘connect with the partnership’ and can be relied upon to safely lead the firm in the future. Ultimately you may be asking some of your partners to trust you with the business that they may have founded or grown over the last 20 to 25 years. Can they trust you to carry on the business and take it onto the future? Remember their capital may be at stake if you muck up! This is why you need to spend time BEFORE the formal part of the admissions process lobbying and building your power base in the partnership. (See 8 ways to build your fan base, part 1 & part 2)

Don’t neglect the emotional part of your business case for partnership

Neglecting the emotional part of your business case for partnership is just one mistake that aspiring partners make on their journey to partnership. To find out about other common mistakes that aspiring partners make with their business case then read 5 most common mistakes that aspiring partners make with their personal business case.

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